News and notes from Reston (tm).

Monday, November 9, 2009

A Thanksgiving Miracle: Compare Foods to Open at Tall Oaks on Nov. 20

Picture 3.jpgHey, remember that time Giant closed its grocery store at Tall Oaks Shopping Center right around Thanksgiving 2007, and then after bleach-intensive Food Lion spinoff Bloom passed, a place called Fresh World sold live eels and seaweed and whatnot until it, too, went out of business earlier this year?

Well, we've received word that the new international grocery store slated to take its place, Compare Foods, will open its doors on Nov. 20, just in time for Thanksgiving! We went by Tall Oaks the other day, and work is proceeding apace on the interior of the store, though the only posted signs outside were all in Spanish, so we couldn't figure them out. But hey -- hopefully we'll have a new source for seaweed and hot peppers just in time for our annual turkey day dinner after all!

50 comments:

  1. Is this a Green Card optional store, gringo?

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  2. do they sell legal or illegal turkeys?

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  3. Come on, people. Would you rather have an international supermarket or a blighted empty shopping center?

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  4. You know, I lived in Reston back when it was entirely white-bred, and I have to tell you it was very boring. There were no good restaurants. In the elementary schools everyone was white and if you didn't conform exactly (and wear the right pair of $80 jeans) you were made fun of. It sucked.

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  5. You know, the bias some posters are showing on this site lately is astounding, and please don't put it under the veil of humor, because it is pathetic.

    Grow up people, diversity is here to stay, and should be embraced, especially in this community!

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  6. I hope they'll still have a ramen noodle aisle.

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  7. Keep the lobster tank, please!

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  8. Dose anyone know whare I can get my knives sharpened for holiday cooking?

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  9. @Anonymous 4:23

    Nice Toughskins, dorkwad!

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  10. Anon 7:50 --

    "Does anyone know whare I can get my knives sharpened for holiday cooking?"

    Try the local MS-13 chapter.

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  11. "You know, the bias some posters are showing on this site lately is astounding, and please don't put it under the veil of humor, because it is pathetic."

    Right. We can joke about our "white bread" roots, but heaven forbid we should laugh at our illegal neighbors. Clearly political correctness run amok, senora.

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  12. I hope this grocery store lives long and prospers.

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  13. An empty store is preferable to one that's going to attract even more illegals and gang bangers to the community.

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  14. gang bangers! Someone from 1994 is posting anonymously in the present! Amazing!

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  15. hey 4:23 at least back then reston was not filled with gangs,and illegals.

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  16. lobster tank ! too funny.

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  17. i believe the sign asked for applicants for bakery shop inside. one of the two positions was for a pastry chef.

    panaderia is Spanish for bakery

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  18. What incredibly boring lives some of you guys must have. I have lived in Reston for almost 30 years and the diversity makes it an infinitely more interesting and worthwhile place to live. God forbid anybody nonwhite should move in... unless you can get that person to clean your house for minimum wage.

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  19. They're actually good for yard work as well, 12:22.

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  20. Anon 12:42

    your statement makes me very happy to have a young black family in the white house. racism reveals ignorance - always has, always will.

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  21. not so much for yard work

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  22. What about reverse racsim...is there such a thing?

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  23. Racism is racism there is no 'reverse-racism' That would be the logical opposite of racism which is not racism. But most people who cry 'reverse racism' mean racism against whites. It happens, but not nearly as much as douche bags like Glenn Beck would have us believe.

    Funnily enough, plenty of posters (or the same douchebag over and over) have displayed racism and intolerance here on the Restonian in this thread.

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  24. Broke in Charter Oak (BiCO)November 10, 2009 at 2:57 PM

    What's this? A suburb devoid of color and individuality and replete with uniform earth-toned homes on uninspiring cul-de-sacs near huge parking lots is chanting the battle cry of "diversity is scary?" No! Really? You could have knocked me over with a feather!

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  25. I just saw Rev Al and Gleen Beck picking out lobsters at Giant.

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  26. Hot latino always welcome to move into neighborhood. Dress appropriate as always.

    http://www.inquisitr.com/46763/geisy-arruda-photo-video/

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  27. If they were going to imitate a Mediterranean city like Portofino, they could've chosen more vibrant colors.

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  28. I'm happy to have a young black family in the White House as well, even if one of the adults is only half-black and the other is less than 100% black. Maybe we should change the name to the Black and White House or maybe the Mulatto House?

    The problem is that ethnic and racist humor is okay as long as the butt of the joke are whites. I can imagine the hue and cry that would go up if any white comedian were to carry on about non-whites the way that George Lopez or Carlos Mencia or even David Chappelle carry on about whites. A perfect example is political humor. George Bush was regularly lampooned as "Chimpie" in the WaPo and nobody thought about it. However, the second that Obama was portrayed as a chimpanzee, the whole black political establishment acted as if there had been a high-tech lynching.

    The sword cuts both ways. If you can't take it, then don't dish it out.

    BTW, I'm also a mixed breed, which includes relatives from Spain and its colonies. Because I am part of the ethnic/racial group, it is impossible for my humor to be characterized as racist. It's like one black on the bus calling another one "Nigger". (Yes, this has happened too often on my bus.) It's tasteless perhaps, but it's not inherently racist.

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  29. I agree 100% with everything you have said. And guess what, I am not white i am half black and half korean.

    Thanks again for the post 4:15, bravo!

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  30. Anon 4:15

    Amen, and thank you.

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  31. Anon 4:15, it is quite possible for your humor to be racist, because from your posting, it seems quite likely that you are racist, ergo your humor is as well.

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  32. Any twat that tells me whats not funny is a twat

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  33. I agree with you on that, 10:22. But my humor so far has been directed at ethnic and racial groups that are part of my ancestry. Because these groups are part of my family lineage and because my jokes have been directed within my ancestry, my comments are not inherently racist. Basic logic, actually, which is a shade of grey that your racist-tinted glasses apparently doesn't allow you to see.

    But while we're casting aspersions, I submit that you are actually the racist. I believe that your agenda is to control the conversation for the group. I believe that you are attempting to play the "white guilt" card, thus eliminating any discussion of race that doesn't conform to your own. Maybe you should look inside of yourself, 10:22.

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  34. Racism occurs whenever skin color is used as a “weapon” or a means to gain advantage. Racists come in all colors… not restricted to only whites…

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  35. Brooklyn Bridge SalesmanNovember 11, 2009 at 2:48 PM

    In all this back and forth about racism, diversity, etc. -- allow me to focus on it from a different perspective. Hidden in plain sight in all these postings is one that perhaps gets to the heart of the matter:

    Anon 10:25 of November 10 said
    "at least back then Reston was not filled with gangs and illegals."

    Bingo. I think it's not racial or ethnic differences, but rather socio-economic differences that drive the unease about "diversity". If, for example, you are white and living a relatively comfortable middle-class life in Reston in a neighborhood of $500,000+ detached houses (or an equally middle-class townhouse or condo community) you are probably not going to be uncomfortable having black, Latino, or Asian neighbors on your street or in your building. Why? Because they are as affluent as you, have just as much a stake in their home as you do, and probably share your basic values.

    But if you see people (especially in low-income housing) who from their behavior and/or dress are probably gang members or homie wanna-be's, or if you see day laborers (at least some of whom almost certainly are illegal immigrants)congregating on Elden Street, you may in fact feel disturbed or even threatened by what you see. Feeling this way does not necessarily make someone a racist.

    I came of age in a fairly tough lower middle-class neighborhood in one of New York City's outer boroughs in the 1960's and 1970's. My neighborhood had once been overwhelmingly white ethnic in nature but by the mid 1970's was predominantly black. Even if the two races didn't really mix socially, we were all civil to each other, and almost all the black neighbors on my street were more than decent (more so than a couple of my white neighbors). I think that, as lower middle class homeowners, deep down both groups shared many fundamental values. But I also don't think any of the white ethnics were too enthralled by the out-of-area black and Latino students from the ghetto neighborhoods elsewhere in the borough who came every day to attend the public high school in our neighborhood. Again, this negative reaction to them wasn't based primarily on race (although I won't deny that race played no role whatsoever) so much as on the disruptive or even criminal behavior and actions some of them displayed that mirrored their upbringing in a poor ghetto.

    So, maybe we need to realize there are many different angles to diversity and race, and that honest people can legitimately have differences of opinion on those issues without being labeled racist.

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  36. very well written-

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  37. Broke in Charter Oak (BiCO)November 12, 2009 at 8:56 AM

    Bravo to you both, Anonymous @ 4:15 and Brooklyn Bridge Salesman! You two perfectly summarized my own feelings on the issue in far fewer words than my own verbose self could have spewed forth! :-)

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  38. Brooklyn,

    I agree, but remember these posts are all in response to the opening of a Latino grocery store. There's obviously nothing gang-oriented about this place- I used to go to the old international market all the time, and though it got pretty run-down at the end, the people who shopped there were perfectly nice.

    I think *that's* why people are crying racism- because the opening of this store has people automatically jumping to "gangs" and "lawn care". It's the implication that all our Latino neighbors are devaluing the area. And if you read the first several posts, people (or maybe just one person?) are clearly saying that.

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  39. 2:48 says, "So, maybe we need to realize there are many different angles to diversity and race, and that honest people can legitimately have differences of opinion on those issues without being labeled racist".

    Perhaps they "can" but often they are called racist anyway.. and it can have lasting personal impact even if, and especially if unjustified.. except of course when one can hide behind a screen name.

    This is why this nation can not have a rational discussion on the topic, and it will remain in the shadows for as far as the eye can see.. pity...

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  40. It's interesting how often racism is assumed based on differing perceptions of the situation. My sister works in rental property management. She laments that she's had more than one black applicant accuse her of racial discrimination when she declines a rental application, although she explains that they failed either the credit or criminal background check. I've never asked her, though, if she's ever had this kind of problem with other ethnic and racial groups.

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  41. Everyone hush now...

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  42. Attention everyone! Does anyone know if the Redbox will remain in the store? Holla!

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  43. Store is still not open - Sign advertising (two of them)for baker employ is SPANISH ONLY TEXT - if they keep this crap up I'll never shop there - And I was looking forward to it

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  44. Reverse Discrimination by Hispanic Supermarket Prompts Settlement:

    http://www.virginiabusinesslitigationlawyer.com/2009/05/reverse-discrimination-by-hisp.html

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  45. I heard the store has failed inspections, which have delayed closing . . .

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  46. Sorry, delayed opening . . .

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  47. When is this place going to open? Any news?

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  48. I thought this thread was about an 'ethnic' supermarket that opened up off of Wiehle Avenue. It's gotten way off track, with these dueling diatribes about race, gangs, politics, etc. All relevant to modern American life, but the question is whether Compare Foods is a good place to shop.

    I have lived down the street for quite a while and was very disappointed when the Giant closed in late 2007. Then 'Fresh' World moved in; that place was truly horrible and had atrocious customer service. One time I went there and found that they were out of orange juice! I can't say that I have ever gone to a supermarket that didn't have orange juice, and I pointed this out to the 15 year old kid working at the customer 'service' desk, who apparently didn't know English too well (BTW he wasn't Hispanic), and he pointed down to indicate that this was such a place. Though you could buy a gallon of cattle blood for your cooking needs. Unbelievable. Not too surprisingly, not-so-Fresh World went out of business several weeks later.

    Finally, almost a year later, Compare Foods opened. They actually spent some money and renovated the old Giant store, as opposed to not-so-Fresh World, whose owners didn't even seem to make the effort to have someone mop the floors.

    Compare Foods is not Harris Teeter, Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, or Giant for that matter, but from my experience they have good customer service and have a decent selection. Of course, they have a lot of Latino foods (that's a large portion of their clientele, after all), but they also have some organic foods and upscale brands. They also have a large selection of produce, seafood and wines. Prices are comparable to Giant; if you want bargains and are willing to drive for 20 minutes, go to Costco, but this place is convenient. Simply put, the store's selection reflects the demands of their customers, who are largely Hispanic, and the demographics of this part of Reston.

    I think that it is absolutely absurd that anyone who lives nearby and plans to stay here, or who is a homeowner regardless of whether they intend to stay, could possibly say that it would be better to have a vacant store at the Tall Oaks shopping center. Really? A supermarket is the flagship store at many shopping centers, and the absence of such a store has a major impact on other businesses, property values and the neighborhood. Who would want to buy a home near a nearly vacant shopping center? I wouldn't.

    In a few years, the metro station will open within walking distance of the store. This should be a major benefit for the older part of Reston, which has been overtaken by the Town Center and the area north of Baron Cameron. Until then, let's have some of the basic services and amenities that any neighborhood, including an increasingly diverse one, should expect.

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